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Call to Worship Scriptures to Captivate your Congregation

Call to Worship Scriptures

The Call to Worship is one of the most important parts of any worship service. It sets the tone for the rest of the service, inviting the congregation to focus on God and prepare their hearts for worship. It also gives the worship leader an opportunity to share a powerful message from God’s Word that can move, inspire, and engage the people.

I have experienced this myself many times as a worship leader. There are some scriptures that just speak to me in a profound way, and I feel compelled to share them with others. Sometimes, they are exactly what the congregation needs to hear, and I can see the impact they have on their faces and expressions.

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In this post, I want to share with you 15 of my favorite Call to Worship scriptures, categorized by theme or mood. These are scriptures that I have used or plan to use in my own worship services, and I hope they will inspire you as well.

For each scripture, I will explain why I think it is a powerful Call to Worship, and offer some suggestions on how to deliver it effectively. I will also share some personal stories or reflections on how these scriptures have affected my own worship experience.

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Let’s begin!

Awe and Reverence

These are scriptures that highlight God’s majesty and power, and remind us of who He is and what He has done. They inspire awe and reverence in our hearts, and make us want to worship Him with all that we have.

Psalm 95Psalm 95:1-7

Come, let us sing for joy to the Lord;
let us shout aloud to the Rock of our salvation.
Let us come before him with thanksgiving
and extol him with music and song.
For the Lord is the great God,
the great King above all gods.
In his hand are the depths of the earth,
and the mountain peaks belong to him.
The sea is his, for he made it,
and his hands formed the dry land.
Come, let us bow down in worship,
let us kneel before the Lord our Maker;
for he is our God
and we are the people of his pasture,
the flock under his care.

This is one of my go-to scriptures for a Call to Worship. It has everything: an invitation to sing, shout, and praise God; a declaration of God’s greatness and sovereignty over all creation; and a recognition of our relationship with Him as His people and His sheep. It also has a beautiful rhythm and flow that makes it easy to read and memorize.

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To deliver this scripture effectively, I suggest using a confident and joyful tone, and emphasizing the words “come”, “let us”, and “for”. You can also invite the congregation to join you in reading the last two verses, as a way of expressing their commitment to worship God together.

I remember using this scripture once in a service where we were celebrating God’s faithfulness and provision for our church. It was a perfect way to start the service, as it reminded us of how great and good God is, and how much He loves and cares for us.

Revelation 4:8-11Revelation 4

Each of the four living creatures had six wings and was covered with eyes all around, even under its wings. Day and night they never stop saying:
“Holy, holy, holy is the Lord God Almighty,
who was, and is, and is to come.”

Whenever the living creatures give glory, honor and thanks to him who sits on the throne and who lives for ever and ever, the twenty-four elders fall down before him who sits on the throne and worship him who lives for ever and ever. They lay their crowns before the throne and say:
“You are worthy, our Lord and God,
to receive glory and honor and power,
for you created all things,
and by your will they were created
and have their being.”

This is another scripture that I love to use for a Call to Worship, especially when I want to create a sense of awe and wonder in the congregation. It gives us a glimpse of the heavenly worship that is happening right now, and invites us to join in with the angels and the elders in praising God. It also emphasizes God’s holiness, eternity, and worthiness, and challenges us to surrender everything to Him.

To deliver this scripture effectively, I suggest using a reverent and awe-filled tone, and pausing after each phrase to let the words sink in. You can also use some visual aids, such as images or videos of the throne room of God, or some symbolic gestures, such as bowing or lifting your hands, to enhance the impact of the scripture.

I also remember using this scripture once in a service where we were focusing on the theme of worship. It was a powerful way to start the service, as it made us feel like we were part of something bigger and more glorious than ourselves, and that we were joining in with the worship of heaven.

Gratitude and Joy

These are verses that inspire thanksgiving and celebration, and remind us of God’s goodness and grace. They fill our hearts with gratitude and joy, and make us want to worship Him with gladness and enthusiasm.

Psalm 100Psalm 100

Shout for joy to the Lord, all the earth.
Worship the Lord with gladness;
come before him with joyful songs.
Know that the Lord is God.
It is he who made us, and we are his;
we are his people, the sheep of his pasture.
Enter his gates with thanksgiving
and his courts with praise;
give thanks to him and praise his name.
For the Lord is good and his love endures forever;
his faithfulness continues through all generations.

This is one of the most well-known and beloved psalms, and for good reason. It is a simple and joyful expression of gratitude and praise to God, and a call to worship Him with all that we have. It also reminds us of who God is and who we are in relation to Him: He is our Creator, our Shepherd, and our Father, and we are His people, His sheep, and His children.

To deliver this scripture effectively, I suggest using a cheerful and lively tone, and encouraging the congregation to shout, sing, and clap along with you. You can also use some musical instruments, such as drums, guitars, or tambourines, to add some rhythm and energy to the scripture.

I most use this scripture when celebrating God’s blessings and answered prayers. It is a great way to start the service, as it lifted our spirits and filled us with joy and gratitude.

1 Chronicles 16:8-121 Chronicles 16

Give praise to the Lord, proclaim his name;
make known among the nations what he has done.
Sing to him, sing praise to him;
tell of all his wonderful acts.
Glory in his holy name;
let the hearts of those who seek the Lord rejoice.
Look to the Lord and his strength;
seek his face always.
Remember the wonders he has done,
his miracles, and the judgments he pronounced,

This is another scripture that I often use for a Call to Worship, especially when I want to celebrate God’s works and deeds. It is a call to praise God for who He is and what He has done, and to share His name and fame with others. It also invites us to seek God’s presence and power, and to remember His wonders and miracles.

To deliver this scripture effectively, I suggest using a passionate and enthusiastic tone, and inviting the congregation to sing, praise, and tell with you. You can also use some testimonies, stories, or examples of God’s wonderful acts, either from the Bible or from your own experience, to illustrate the scripture.

I remember reading this Bible verse during a service where we were remembering how God saved and protected our church. It was a good way to start the service because it reminded us of how great and good God is and made us want to praise and proclaim Him.

Renewal and Transformation

These are passages that speak to God’s ability to change us, guide us, and remind us of His promises and plans for us. They inspire renewal and transformation in our hearts and make us want to worship Him with trust and obedience.

Romans 12:1-2

Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship. Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—his good, pleasing and perfect will.

This is one of my favorite scriptures for a Call to Worship, especially when I want to challenge the congregation to live out their faith in the world. It is a call to offer ourselves to God as a living sacrifice, and to let Him transform us by His Word and Spirit. It also defines what true and proper worship is: not just singing songs or saying prayers, but living a life that honors God and aligns with His will.

To deliver this scripture effectively, I suggest using a serious and earnest tone, and emphasizing the words “offer”, “living”, “transformed”, and “will”. You can also invite the congregation to respond to the scripture by making a personal commitment to God, either silently or aloud, to offer themselves to Him and to seek His will.

It was during a service where we were talking about mentoring that I remember using this verse. It was a powerful way to start the service because it made us think about our lives and give them over to God.

Isaiah 40:28-31Isaiah 40

Do you not know?
Have you not heard?
The Lord is the everlasting God,
the Creator of the ends of the earth.
He will not grow tired or weary,
and his understanding no one can fathom.
He gives strength to the weary
and increases the power of the weak.
Even youths grow tired and weary,
and young men stumble and fall;
but those who hope in the Lord
will renew their strength.
They will soar on wings like eagles;
they will run and not grow weary,
they will walk and not be faint.

This is another scripture that I often use for a Call to Worship, especially when I want to encourage the congregation to trust in God and to rely on His strength. It is a call to acknowledge God’s greatness and wisdom, and to receive His grace and power. It also promises that those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength, and will soar, run, and walk with Him.

To deliver this scripture effectively, I suggest using a hopeful and uplifting tone, and emphasizing the words “know”, “heard”, “hope”, and “renew.”. You can also invite the congregation to express their hope in the Lord by raising their hands, closing their eyes, or repeating the last verse with you.

I remember using this scripture on one of the service where we were praying for those who were going through trials and difficulties. It was a comforting way to start the service, as it reminded us of God’s faithfulness and power and His ability to renew us and lift us up.

Action and Service

These are scriptures that call us to live out our faith in the world and remind us of God’s mission and purpose for us. They inspire action and service in our hearts, and they make us want to worship Him with obedience and love.

Micah 6:8Micah 6

He has shown you, O mortal, what is good.
And what does the Lord require of you?
To act justly and to love mercy
and to walk humbly with your God.

This is one of my favorite scriptures for a Call to Worship, especially when I want to challenge the congregation to reflect God’s character and values in the world. It is a call to act justly and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with God. It also summarizes what God requires of us, and what is good in His sight.

To deliver this scripture effectively, I suggest using a clear and direct tone, and emphasizing the words “act”, “love”, and “walk”. You can also invite the congregation to respond to the scripture by asking themselves how they can act justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with God in their daily lives.

When we were talking about social justice at a service, I recall having read this verse. It was a good way to start the service because it made us think about our actions and attitudes and how they fit with God’s heart and will.

Matthew 28:18-20Matthew 28

Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”

This is another scripture that I often use for a Call to Worship, especially when I want to encourage the congregation to share the gospel and to make disciples. It is a call to go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them and teaching them to obey Jesus. It also affirms Jesus’ authority and presence, and His promise to be with us always.

To deliver this scripture effectively, I suggest using a confident and bold tone, and emphasizing the words “go”, “make”, “baptize”, and “teach”. You can also invite the congregation to respond to the scripture by committing to follow Jesus’ command, and to pray for the nations and the people groups that need to hear the gospel.

In a ceremony when we were sending out missionaries to a foreign country, I recall using this scripture. The opening prayer was appropriate because it emphasized Jesus’ promise and commission and urged the congregation to join the missionaries in their mission.

Community and Unity

These are verses that emphasize the importance of belonging and fellowship in faith, and remind us of God’s design and desire for us. They inspire community and unity in our hearts, and make us want to worship Him with harmony and love.

Psalm 133Psalm 133

How good and pleasant it is
when God’s people live together in unity!
It is like precious oil poured on the head,
running down on the beard,
running down on Aaron’s beard,
down on the collar of his robe.
It is as if the dew of Hermon
were falling on Mount Zion.
For there the Lord bestows his blessing,
even life forevermore.

This is one of my favorite scriptures for a Call to Worship, especially when I want to celebrate God’s gift and grace of community. It is a call to appreciate and enjoy the unity and harmony of God’s people, and to compare it to precious oil and refreshing dew. It also promises that God bestows His blessing and life on those who live together in unity.

I propose that you read this passage of scripture with an inviting and kind tone, highlighting the terms “good,” “pleasant,” “unity,” and “blessing” to make your point more impactful. As a response to the scripture, you can also encourage the congregation to welcome and embrace one another, express their love and thanks, and thank God together.

Once, when we were celebrating our church anniversary, the pastor read this passage from the Bible. We were reminded of how blessed we are to be a part of God’s family, and it was a beautiful way to start the service.

Ephesians 4:1-6Ephesians 4

As a prisoner for the Lord, then, I urge you to live a life worthy of the calling you have received. Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one another in love. Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace. There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called to one hope when you were called; one Lord, one faith, one baptism; one God and Father of all, who is over all and through all and in all.

This is another scripture that I often use for a Call to Worship, especially when I want to encourage the congregation to maintain and cultivate the unity and diversity of the church. It is a call to live a life worthy of the calling we have received, and to be humble, gentle, patient, and loving with each other. It also affirms the oneness and the diversity of the church, and the centrality of God in all things.

My recommendation for a heartfelt and genuine delivery of this passage is to highlight the phrases “live,” “worthy,” “unity,” and “one” while maintaining a steady pace. Another way to have the congregation respond to the scripture is to encourage them to celebrate the variety within the church and to pledge to living in peace and harmony with one another.

I once read this passage aloud at a service when we were receiving new members into our church. The beginning of the service was meaningful because it brought to mind the beauty and richness of the church, as well as our calling and responsibility as God’s people.

5 Other Scriptures to Captivate your Congregation This Sunday

While still on this call to worship post, I remember one time when I was leading a worship service at a youth camp. I had chosen a scripture from Psalm 95 that spoke about God’s greatness and our response to him. As I read the words aloud, I could feel the atmosphere in the room change. The kids became more attentive, more curious, and more expectant. They were ready to worship God with all their hearts.

That’s the power of scripture. It can transform any worship service from a routine to a revelation. It can reveal God’s character, his promises, his will, and his love. It can challenge us, comfort us, convict us, and encourage us. It can stir up our emotions, our thoughts, our actions, and our faith.

Powerful Inspiring Prayers For Veterans Meetings
Photo by Jack Sharp on Unsplash

Here are 5 other scriptures to look into for your worship service.

Psalm 51:10-17

“Create in me a pure heart, O God, and renew a steadfast spirit within me. Do not cast me from your presence or take your Holy Spirit from me. Restore to me the joy of your salvation and grant me a willing spirit, to sustain me. Then I will teach transgressors your ways, so that sinners will turn back to you.

Deliver me from the guilt of bloodshed, O God, you who are God my Savior, and my tongue will sing of your righteousness. Open my lips, Lord, and my mouth will declare your praise. You do not delight in sacrifice, or I would bring it; you do not take pleasure in burnt offerings. My sacrifice, O God, is a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart you, God, will not despise.”

This scripture is a beautiful Call to Worship because it expresses a sincere prayer for forgiveness and restoration. It also shows us the consequences of sin and the need for repentance. It also reveals God’s desire for a pure heart and a willing spirit. It also commits to praise God and teach others his ways. It sets the tone for a worship service that is full of confession, repentance, and restoration.

2 Corinthians 5:17-21

“Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, the new creation has come: The old has gone, the new is here! All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ and gave us the ministry of reconciliation: that God was reconciling the world to himself in Christ, not counting people’s sins against them. And he has committed to us the message of reconciliation. We are therefore Christ’s ambassadors, as though God were making his appeal through us. We implore you on Christ’s behalf: Be reconciled to God. God made him who had no sin to be sin for us, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.”

This scripture is a wonderful Call to Worship because it proclaims the amazing truth of the new creation in Christ. It also explains the source and purpose of our reconciliation with God. It also commissions us to be Christ’s ambassadors and share the message of reconciliation with others. It also invites us to be reconciled to God and receive his righteousness. It prepares us for a worship service that is full of gratitude, transformation, and mission.

Micah 6:6-8

“With what shall I come before the Lord and bow down before the exalted God? Shall I come before him with burnt offerings, with calves a year old? Will the Lord be pleased with thousands of rams, with ten thousand rivers of olive oil? Shall I offer my firstborn for my transgression, the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul? He has shown you, O mortal, what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.”

This scripture is a profound Call to Worship because it questions the value of religious rituals and sacrifices. It also reveals God’s true requirements for his people: to act justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with him. It also challenges us to examine our hearts and actions, and to align them with God’s will. It sets the tone for a worship service that is full of justice, mercy, and humility.

James 1:22-27

“Do not merely listen to the word, and so deceive yourselves. Do what it says. Anyone who listens to the word but does not do what it says is like someone who looks at his face in a mirror and, after looking at himself, goes away and immediately forgets what he looks like. But whoever looks intently into the perfect law that gives freedom, and continues in it—not forgetting what they have heard, but doing it—they will be blessed in what they do.

Those who consider themselves religious and yet do not keep a tight rein on their tongues deceive themselves, and their religion is worthless.
Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world.”

This scripture is a powerful Call to Worship because it warns us against being hearers only and not doers of the word. It also compares the word to a mirror that shows us our true selves. It also encourages us to look intently into the word and do what it says. It also defines true religion as caring for the needy and keeping oneself from the world’s corruption. It sets the tone for a worship service that is full of action, service, and purity.

Isaiah 6:1-8

“In the year that King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord, high and exalted, seated on a throne; and the train of his robe filled the temple. Above him were seraphim, each with six wings: With two wings they covered their faces, with two they covered their feet, and with two they were flying. And they were calling to one another: ‘Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; the whole earth is full of his glory.’ At the sound of their voices the doorposts and thresholds shook and the temple was filled with smoke.

‘Woe to me!’ I cried. ‘I am ruined! For I am a man of unclean lips, and I live among a people of unclean lips, and my eyes have seen the King, the Lord Almighty.’ Then one of the seraphim flew to me with a live coal in his hand, which he had taken with tongs from the altar. With it he touched my mouth and said, ‘See, this has touched your lips; your guilt is taken away and your sin atoned for.’ Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, ‘Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?’ And I said, ‘Here am I. Send me!’”

This scripture is a powerful Call to Worship because it shows us the prophet Isaiah’s encounter with God. It reveals God’s glory and holiness, and how it affects us. It also shows us God’s grace and mercy, and how it transforms us. It also shows us God’s mission and calling, and how it compels us. It prepares us for a worship service that is full of awe, repentance, gratitude, and obedience.

Tips for Choosing the Right Scripture

Choosing the right scripture for a Call to Worship can make a big difference in how the service starts and flows. Here are some tips to help you choose the right scripture for your worship service:

  • Consider the tone of the service. What is the theme or the message of the service? What is the mood or the atmosphere you want to create? Choose a scripture that matches or complements the tone of the service, and that prepares the congregation for what is to come.
  • Consider the audience. Who are the people you are leading in worship? What are their needs, struggles, joys, and hopes? Choose a scripture that speaks to them, and that connects with their experiences and emotions.
  • Consider the overall message you want to convey. What is the main point or the takeaway you want the congregation to remember and apply from the service? Choose a scripture that summarizes or supports the overall message, and that challenges or inspires the congregation to action.

Creative Ways to Present the Call to Worship

Presenting the Call to Worship in a creative way can make it more engaging and memorable for the congregation. Here are some creative ways to present the Call to Worship in your worship service:

  • Use music. Music is a powerful tool to communicate and enhance the message of the scripture. You can use a song that relates to the scripture, either by singing it yourself, playing a recording, or inviting the congregation to sing along. You can also use instrumental music, such as piano, guitar, or violin, to create a mood or a background for the scripture.
  • Use readings. Readings are a simple and effective way to present the scripture. You can use different types of readings, such as poetry, stories, quotes, or testimonies, that relate to the scripture, either by reading them yourself, inviting someone else to read them, or displaying them on a screen. You can also use different voices, such as children, youth, or elders, to read the scripture, or to read different parts of the scripture.
  • Use choral renditions. Choral renditions are a beautiful and harmonious way to present the scripture. You can use a choir, a small group, or even the whole congregation, to recite or sing the scripture in unison or in parts. You can also use different languages, dialects, or accents, to reflect the diversity and the unity of the church.
  • Use multimedia elements. Multimedia elements are a modern and visual way to present the scripture. You can use images, videos, animations, or slides, to illustrate or enhance the message of the scripture, either by showing them on a screen, projecting them on a wall, or displaying them on a device. You can also use sound effects, lighting, or props, to create a mood or a context for the scripture.

Remember the Importance of Delivery

Delivery is the way you present the scripture to the congregation, and it can make or break the impact of the scripture. Here are some things to remember about the importance of delivery in your Call to Worship:

  • Speak with conviction. Conviction is the belief and the confidence in what you are saying. Speak with conviction, and show the congregation that you believe and care about the scripture, and that it matters to you and to them.
  • Speak with passion. Passion is the emotion and the enthusiasm in what you are saying. Speak with passion, and show the congregation that you love and enjoy the scripture, and that it excites and inspires you and them.
  • Speak with clarity. Clarity is the understanding and the communication of what you are saying. Speak with clarity, and show the congregation that you know and explain the scripture, and that it is clear and relevant to you and to them.


Conclusion

Using scriptures to create meaningful Calls to Worship is a great way to start your worship service with God’s Word and Spirit. It can help you set the tone, convey the message, and engage the congregation in worship. It can also challenge, inspire, and transform you and your congregation as you encounter God and His truth.

I hope this post has given you some ideas and tips on how to choose and present the right scripture for your Call to Worship. I also hope you have enjoyed reading some of my favorite Call to Worship scriptures, and how they have impacted my own worship experience.

I would love to hear from you. What are some of your favorite Call to Worship scriptures, and why? How do you present them in your worship service? How have they affected your worship experience? Please share your thoughts and stories in the comments below.

Thank you for reading, and may God bless you and your worship ministry.

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